Historical Marker Trail

LA Highway 3049

As you drive along LA Highway 3049 and US Highway 71, take note of the many Historical Markers that denote many of the historical locations and achievements that have been part of making the culture of northern Caddo Parish.

You'll find them at:

  • Cash Point Plantation
    • Established 1839. Typical of the large river plantation of the mid 19th century, the 1,647 acres were located on both the Caddo and Bossier sides of the Red River. Cash Point Plantation was successively owned by several large land owners of the region: Pickett, Gilmer, and Sentell. In 1893, Mattie Sentell came into possession of the 960 acres in Caddo Parish. It remained in the Sentell family until 1967, when portions were sold to the Franks- Duggan interests and the Steve Prator family. The 100 acre pecan orchard was purchased by Judy and Bill McColgan in 2010.
  • Cash Point, Gold Point & Buckhall Plantation
    • Three historic plantations, Cash Point, Gold Point, and Buckhall Plantations, date back to 1839, when they were purchased by James Belton Pickett, Paulina de Graffenried, and James Blair Gilmer. The Buckhall portion located on the north and east side was owned by Whitfield Vance. The plantations are now owned by the Pittman and Volentine families, and the Crow-McColgan interests.
  • Pittman Plantation
    • of Shreveport, began a series of ownership changes. In 1912, Samuel S. Pittman and his wife, Pattie, purchased land in Section 14, formerly held by James Pickett. The house, built in 1913, had four rooms and a center hall. In 1920, a second story was added with two bedrooms, a trunk room and a large room for parties and dancing. The one-story porch was replaced with a two-story porch and a porte-cochere was added in the late 1930s. The house has been the home of the Pittman and Volentine families since it was built in 1913. It is currently owned by Leah and Ray Volentine.
  • Pickett Plantation
    • One of the many properties acquired by James Belton Pickett in the period following the succession of the Caddo Indian lands to the United States, circa 1837. Pickett, of South Carolina, came to this area circa 1836. He became one of the founders of Shreveport, and owner of 13 plantations. In 1922, Lilla Cavett and Walter Lee Sibley acquired Pickett Place which remained in the Sibley Family for 83 years. In 2005, William Gordon Boogaerts acquired Pickett Place from the Sibley Family.
  • Dixie Gin
    • The first cotton gin on this site was built by John M. Sentell circa 1895. It was a wooden structure painted red and known as The Red Gin. It burned and was replaced by the current structure circa 1933. In 1953 Lowry and Wash Sentell modernized the gin with new machinery and steel wagon sheds with Butler Dodson as a partner during this period. Later the gin was bought by JimmY Lee Sloan, Jim Adger and Moulton Storey and renamed Dixie Gin. The present owner is Sandy Saunders who leases the gin for social occasions.
  • Mounds Plantation
    • The Mounds Plantation site originally included seven mounds arranged around a large plaza with at least three more located on the peripheries. Some of the mounds contain human burials; others were used as platforms for sacred buildings. The Caddo Indians, descendants of the Troyville-Coles Creeks, lived at the Mounds Plantation site between A.D. 900 and 1200 as dated by Dr. Clarence Webb and other archaeologists. They returned during the 17th century and made additional burials. The site remains sacred to members of the modern Caddo Nation. Caddo Indian Ceremonial Temple Mounds are dated in the Mississippian Cultural period. Originally, there were ten mounds in the area south of Dixie.
  • North Plantation
    • The W. H. North Plantation dates back to 1886. The original home was moved with mules and wagons from the bank of the Red River in 1903 to the present site on Cottonwood Bayou. After being destroyed by fire in 1923, the home was rebuilt on the original foundation. Dr. and Mrs. Frank Harmon purchased the home in 2000 and began extensive renovations in keeping with the original design.
  • Dixie Presbyterian Church
    • The church began in 1902 as the Presbyterian-Methodist Church of Dixie as a result of an agreement between the minister, Mr. Ziegler, and Mr. Ivey, who donated the land on North Road for the church. In 1904, the Red River Presbytery organized the church as the Dixie Presbyterian Church. In 1934, they purchased from the Caddo Parish School Board a two-story brick school building in Dixie which had been built in 1913 and renovated the first floor for church services. In 1964, a tornado destroyed the entire roof and it was restored as a one-story building. In 1996, the Dixie congregation merged with the Belcher Presbyterian Church to form the Belcher-Dixie Presbyterian Church. The Dixie building was then purchased by the current owners Ebenezer Baptist Church.
  • Cairo Plantation
    • Cairo Plantation was established in 1893 by John M. Sentell. The plantation home was partially destroyed by fire and rebuilt in 1950 by Lowery and Antionette Sentell. The other original buildings include the white frame home, which also was the farm office, a commissary, and a corn crib. The farm has been owned and operated by the same family for over 100 years.
  • KWKH Radio Station
    • Early settlers had to depend on steamboats, the mail, and word of mouth to get their news. In the late 1890s, trains would bring in newspapers. In 1922, the first radio station arrived in Shreveport, but with the “crystal” sets available then, hearing the broadcasts was difficult even for Shreveporters. The first broadcasts were made from the Shreveport home of W.E. Anthony. By the time of Shreveport’s centennial in 1935, it had two powerful broadcasting stations, one of them being KWKH. (The other was KTBS.) Mr. Anthony was the chief engineer for KWKH and the station could be heard for hundreds of miles, thus allowing citizens of north Caddo Parish to keep up with world news more easily. KWKH began operation in 1925 with the call letters of the owner and founder William Kennon Henderson, a noted local businessman. The station was established as a 50,000 watt Clear Channel station. In 1933, Henderson sold the station to the Ewing Family of Shreveport who also owned the Shreveport Times newspaper and KTBS radio.
  • KWKH Transmitter Tower
    • The original transmitter tower was built in 1924 at Kennonwood, W.K. Henderson’s property north of Shreveport near Dixie. The studio was originally in the Henderson residence with the transmitter located in a small frame building near the tower. The station’s transmission power was among the strongest in the United States and its signal could be transmitted to approximately half of the nation. The present art deco radio transmitter building and house for the chief engineer were built in 1939 on the same site. Steadman Gunning beginning in 1932, and O.S. Drake in 1935, two of the chief engineers of KWKH, worked a combined 89 years at the station.
  • Killarney Farm
    • Killarney was built by James Stuart Douglas in 1920. It was designed by Edward F. Neild, who was a prominent Shreveport architect in the firm of C. E. Olschner Architect Associates. Killarney was one of the first homes designed by Mr. Neild. Mr. Douglas was a planter, a civic leader, and a member of the Louisiana State Legislature. After a later period of ownership by the Carlisle family, Killarney was purchased by Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Lee in 1949. The home was restored in 1978 and currently is owned by the third generation of the Lee family.
  • Belcher Presbyterian Church
    • Belcher Presbyterian Church was organized on July 18, 1897, as the Red River Presbyterian Church. The congregation met in a vacant store building on Rush Point Plantation for a year. The congregation then moved to a school building on Briarfield Plantation where services were held until 1900 when a one-room frame building was erected in Belcher one mile west of Red River. The present brick English Tudor building was completed and dedicated in May of 1925. The church contains the original pipe organ installed in 1929.
  • Belcher Mound
    • A Caddo mound and village dating between approximately A.D. 1450 and 1650 were located on the site of the Briarfield Plantation northeast of Belcher. The mound consisted of a series of platforms that contained houses or meeting places for the village leaders. The houses were burned and capped with earth periodically. Human burials were placed in deep pits dug from several of the platforms. The site probably was occupied when the DeSoto Expedition crossed Caddo lands in 1542.
  • The Ruben V. Glassell House
    • The original house was built in 1899 by Ruben V. Glassell, a planter, and his wife Vivian. It faced west and had a center hall in the dogtrot style. Around 1910 interior columns and porches on the south and east sides were added, and the south side became the front of the house. In 1953 the east porch was enclosed to form three additional rooms. In 1982 it became the home of Andrew and Linda Marino and their four children.
  • First State Bank of Belcher
    • The First State Bank of Belcher was organized in 1913. The present brick building was designed by Architect Edward F. Neild of Shreveport and was built in 1924. The First State Bank later became Caddo Trust & Savings Bank and had branches in surrounding communities. The Belcher Masonic Lodge #332 was chartered in 1909 with 22 members and met on the second floor. A part of the building also housed the office of Dr. T.B. Tooke at the time.
  • TS&N Railroad and Depots
    • During the 1890s, the Texarkana, Shreveport & Natchez Railroad developed to serve the economic (lumber, cotton, and oil) needs of northeast Caddo Parish. The railroad began in the 1880s as Gate City Lumber Railroad. It was a logging railroad with track from Texarkana, Arkansas, to Hosston, Louisiana. In 1895, it was reorganized as the TS&N Railroad and tracks continued south to Shreveport. The TS&N Railroad was purchased by the Texas & Pacific Railroad in 1901, then by the Missouri Pacific Railroad in the 1960s. The tracks from Texarkana to Hosston were removed in the 1950s and from Hosston to Shreveport in the 1970s.

      As the railroad developed in the 1890s, the towns of Ida, Mira, Hosston, Gilliam, Belcher, and Dixie came into existence. Many of the towns were named for local landowners who provided right-of-way for the railroad. Railroad depots were built in each town.

  • Cedar Bluff Ferry
    • Cedar Bluff Ferry was one of the ferries on the Red River between Bossier and Caddo Parishes in the 19th and early 20th century. It operated until the early 1950s when a bridge was built to the north for Highway 2. It ran from Cedar Bluff in Bossier Parish to Cedar Bluff Parish Road in Caddo Parish. Tolls were 10 cents for a horse and rider and 20 cents for a wagon. Through a system of cables, ropes, pulleys, trees and poles it was manually maneuvered across Red River.
  • Lynn Plantation
    • The Lynn Plantation is probably one of the best surviving cotton plantation complexes from the late 19th, early 20th century. All elements of a cotton plantation are still in existence. In 1904 James Wiley Lynn purchased the farm near Gilliam known as Eagle Chute, followed by the purchase of other farm property in this location from the Cavett family in 1914, to establish Lynn Plantation. The plantation home was built by Mr. & Mrs. J.W. Lynn in 1928. The Lynn Plantation headquarters included the original cotton gin, barns, commissary, blacksmith shop, corncrib, and the renovated dogtrot style home built by James Richard Cavett when he moved from Bossier Parish in 1878 to clear and farm this property.
  • Linda Lay Memorial Baptist Church
    • Organized June 6, 1919, with 12 charter members and named in honor of Mrs. Linda Lay, who had been instrumental in the development of the spiritual life in the town. Constructed in 1920, dedication of the building was held on August 14, 1921. The first pastor was the Reverend J. T. King.
  • Gilliam United Methodist Church
    • Founded in 1900 as the Gilliam Methodist Episcopal Church South, services were conducted in a boxcar by an inerrant minister. The first building was erected on the north side of Red Bayou and was destroyed by the cyclone of 1908. The first pastor was Mr. Cornell. After the cyclone, the church was rebuilt at the current location and remained in use until 1939 when a second building was constructed. In 1955, the existing building was erected. In 1968, after a denominational merger, the church became the Gilliam United Methodist Church.
  • John B. Adger Home
    • The home was designed by well known Shreveport architect Edward F. Neild and constructed in 1917 for John B. and Mildred Adger. Their first home near the Red River had been destroyed by the 1908 cyclone that devastated much of Gilliam. In 1949 John B. Adger sold the home and surrounding farmland to his nephew, Dan P. Logan, and wife, Ethel. In 1999 it became the home of Stephen and Jann Logan and their two children. The farmland remains in the family as an active farming operation known as Logan Farms.
  • Seawell's (Sewell's) Canal, 1830-1873
    • In 1830, Lt. Washington W. Seawell of the United States Corps of Engineers developed a canal connecting Black Bayou and Red Bayou by cleaning out and improving a natural channel between the two bayous. This canal, later named after Lt. Seawell, allowed small riverboats to navigate around the Upper Red River raft by following Twelve Mile Bayou, Caddo Lake, Black Bayou, and Red Bayou. In 1873, when the Upper Red River raft was removed by U.S. Corps of Engineers, riverboats ceased using this route and followed the cleared Red River channel.
  • United States Indian Agency House Caddo Prairie, 1825-1831
    • During the 1820s and the early 1830s, an Indian Agency House was built in the approximate vicinity of Herndon School. This log frame building served the trading needs of the Caddo and other Indian groups in the area. During the mid-1830s, the structure was dismantled and re-erected south of Shreveport in what is now the Ellerbe Road/ Flournoy-Lucas Road area. There were no white settlements in Caddo Indian lands until after the Caddo cession of 1835. There were none until about 1840 in northern Caddo Parish.
  • Hosston School
    • Established in 1872, the original school for the community was located at Caddo Prairie and named Willis School. The first school in Hosston was a wooden one-room building erected in 1900 and was used until 1914, when a building with four classrooms and an auditorium was completed. In 1931, classes moved to the current brick structure.
  • Munnerlyn Chapel Methodist Church & Cemetery
    • Munnerlyn Chapel was the first church to be established in the Ida area. In 1877, pioneer Methodists began meeting in a small log building provided by the Munnerlyn family. Soon a temporary structure was built across the road from the present-day cemetery. In 1901, a new building was erected which also served the area as a school building until 1909. In 1935 a new structure was built that stood until the 1980s. Early teachers at the school included C.C. Whisenhunt who later became superintendent of Caddo Parish Schools.
  • Bethsaida Baptist Church & Cemetery
    • Bethsaida Baptist Church was established in 1883 at this location with the cemetery added shortly. Thomas and Mary Wynn donated the land for the church and the cemetery. The first members were a group of pioneers from Georgia who named it after their beloved church in Atlanta. The one-room building was the first Baptist church and the first school in Ida. Early families were Chandler, Byram, Evans, Whittington, Trant, Bumgardner, Lester, Perdue, Slay, Gryder, Bryant, and Hortman. The present building was constructed around 1902 after the first building had burned. The school was housed in a downtown store until the new building was erected. Early teachers were Irene McFarland, T.W. Goodson, D.W. Proctor, Eunice Gorban Means, J.D. Barber, and C.L. Perry, Sr.
  • Ida Post Office Building
    • This building was erected in 1923 by W. C. Reynolds, an early Postmaster in Ida. It was the location for the Ida Post Office from 1923 until 1962. Following this period, the building was the carpenter shop of J.E. Richardson. In 1997 the building became home for the Ida Museum, and in 2010 was converted into the Fletcher Adams USAF 357th Fighter Group Museum.
  • Ida Methodist Church
    • The Ida Methodist Church was organized in 1903. The present building, dating 1904, was erected on land donated by W.B. Means and J.T. Means. Jim Shaver was the architect and builder. The original building had a bell tower and steeple and the first pews were blocks of wood turned on end with a 1" x 12" board across them. A large wood-burning stove was located in the center aisle with coal and oil lamps providing lighting. The Reverend Robert J. Harp was the first a pastor.
  • Cuba Plantation
    • Cuba, 120 acres on the north bank of Twelve Mile Bayou, was established circa 1839. In 1893, John Mercer Sentell acquired Cuba. Sentell, a planter, had four other plantations including Cairo. The Cuba commissary served steamboat travelers. Sentell’s grandson, Kenneth Sentell Marshall, inherited Cuba in 1948. He and his wife Jonnie Sandifer Marshall built a farmhouse at Cuba, planted multiple crops, and raised farm animals. Their daughter, Margaret Marshall John and her son, Marshall Kenneth John, are the fourth and fifth generations residing at Cuba today.
  • Bayou Point Plantation
    • In the period following the succession of the Caddo Indian lands in 1835, this property became important because of its proximity to the old Twelve Mile Bayou canal, the waterway steamboats navigated to Jefferson, Texas. The canal flowing on the south side had a turning basin to allow steam boats to either turn, or pass, and off-load cargo on trips from Shreveport to Jefferson. After 1839 there were successive owners until the 1920s when Elias Adrian Connell purchased it, and for fifty years it was known as the Connell Place. The Duggan family bought the property and built the present house in 1970. Valerie and Michael John Hoogland acquired this property in 2010 and named it Bayou Point, because of its location as a turning point on this historic waterway.
  • Soda Fount Plantation
    • This property was first owned by A.D. Palmer in 1839. It was passed on to Mary C. Palmer Worthy in 1855. Hanna Palmer, widow of Michael Dickson, inherited the property in 1867 when it was first known as Red River Plantation. The name was changed to Soda Fount in 1892. From 1898 on there were several successive owners until 1947 when Claudius Bickham Dickson, Sr. sold his interest of 870 acres to Floyd Volentine. A home was built by the Volentine family in the 1950s. Of the original 1,740 acres the Volentine family owns 870 acres. The remaining acres are still owned by the heirs of Dr. S.A. Dickson.
  • Missionary Plantation
    • Missionary Plantation was established in 1890 by William Burney Means. The Plantation name originated from a lady who gave most of what she earned to missions. The original home no longer exists. This second home was built in 1929 by Mr. Means daughter, Annie Burney Means Cole. Missionary has had several owners. The present owners are the Von Maltzahn’s, a prominent German family, who purchased it in 1977 as a safe haven in the United States. Their family farm in Germany had been taken following the division of Germany after World War II. A wing in the home is reserved for the Von Maltzahn family. Price and Holli Bundy and their three daughters live in the home and the land is farmed as Bundy Farms.
  • Twelve Mile Bayou
    • Twelve Mile Bayou is the main tributary of the Red River to the lakes and bayous of North Caddo Parish and East Texas. From the 1830s to the early 20th century, it was the passage for steamboats going from the Red River to communities and farms along Caddo Lake, Cypress Bayou, Jeems Bayou, Black Bayou, Red Bayou, and other streams. It also served as a passageway for steamboats to bypass the upper Red River Raft until it was removed in the 1870s.
  • Fairview Farm
    • In 1897, James Richard Cavett, one of Gilliam's early settlers, acquired this 240 acre tract of land. His first child, Elsie Louella Cavett and her husband William Hall McClenaghan named it "Fairview" to honor their Scotch-Irish ancestry. Their oldest son, William Cavett Mcclenaghan, or "Will Mac", started farming here and was one of the first planters in Caddo Parish to use a tractor. He married Gertrude Gale Smith, and they built a white frame farmhouse, a commissary, barns, and other outbuildings, at Fairview, where two of their three daughters were born. At Christmas the commissary had apples, oranges, raisins, and candies that farm hands could purchase using brozines bearing the McClenaghan name. Part of Fairview has been in the same family for over 115 years.
  • Dickson Plantation Home - "Woodlawn"
    • Typical of the large river plantations of the mid-nineteenth century, land was owned on both the Caddo and Bossier sides of the Red River. Beginning in 1849 Woodlawn was successively owned by several large land owners of the region, the A. D. Palmer & Michael Dickson families. The Dickson family built a one-story "dogtrot" house in the middle 1800s. In 1899, M.A. Dickson came into possession of the property in Caddo Parish and built the large white two story Colonial home that stands today. It remained in the Dickson family until 1926, when portions were sold off. The house and part of the land was purchased by Mr. and Mrs. P.J. Cush in 1972. Woodlawn was passed down to Eleanor Margaret "Penny" Cush & Mary C. Mancini in 2012.
  • TS&N/T&P Railroad
    • From the mid-1890s to the early 1970s the Texarkana, Shreveport & Natchez'Texas & Pacific Railroads served the economic and personal needs of northeast Caddo Parish along a roadbed at this site. While the railroad was being built during the 1890s and early 1900s, the towns of Ida, Mira, Hosston, Gilliam, Belcher and Dixie were established. The railroad was vital to the development of lumbering, agriculture and the petroleum industry in the area.
  • Louisiana Maneuvers led by General Patton
    • During the Louisiana Maneuvers of 1941, the U.S. Army and Air Corps divided itself into two opposing armies to practice for possible war in Europe. Among the noted commanders in the maneuvers, was General George S. Patton. His mechanized armored forces launched a flanking attack on Shreveport from a point near Lake Charles and proceeded northward through East Texas and entered north Louisiana just north of Caddo Lake. Before attacking Shreveport from the north, his forces camped overnight on September 27th just to the west of Belcher. The next day the forces proceeded through Belcher and Dixie and successfully attacked Shreveport.
  • Dominick Store
    • In the early 1900s brothers John H. Dominick and Andrew C. Dominick opened a general store in Mira, Louisiana. The wood frame building faced west to the railroad tracks. In 1918 the original building burned and a new brick structure replaced it, facing east to the highway. This building was both a general store for the community and a commissary serving the needs of the farm workers. From 1905 through 1920 the post office in Mira was housed in the Dominick store. Mira in the first half of the twentieth century was a thriving community which included a saw mill, cotton gin, several general stores, a café, a Baptist church, and numerous houses.

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